Types of problems


 

Click on the tabs below to learn more about the types of problems that people can experience.

Low Mood and Depression

Feeling down is a common problem, but if this feeling continues for more than two weeks this could be depression. As well as feeling low, you may lose interest or pleasure in activities you used to enjoy.

Other signs and symptoms can include:

  • Sleep problems
  • Poor appetite or overeating
  • Feeling hopeless
  • Finding it hard to concentrate
  • Feeling bad about yourself
  • Tiredness
  • Moving or speaking slowly, or the opposite: feeling restless and fidgety

What can I do about it?

If you recognise any of these signs we may be able to help. If someone is feeling this way we would offer them step 2 or step 3 or counselling treatments. Please click here to refer yourself to our services.


Bereavement

Bereavement is any kind of loss. Experiencing and coming to terms with loss is hard. We all have our own way of dealing with it. With bereavement comes many emotions, for example, anger, guilt, loneliness and numbness. These can be overwhelming. On top of this you may have other stresses in life. You may need some support and guidance to process these feelings and to stop neglecting other factors in your life.

What can I do about it?

If you recognise any of these signs we may be able to help. If someone is feeling this way we would offer them step 2 or step 3 or counselling treatments. Please click here to refer yourself to our services.


Stress

Experiencing emotional or mental pressure causes stress. This can make you feel like you can’t manage. Events in daily life can cause this; whether positive or negative. Symptoms may include: sleeping problems, loss of appetite, anxiety, irritability, headaches, an increase in drinking/smoking and problems concentrating.

What can I do about it?

If you recognise any of these signs we may be able to help. If someone is feeling this way we would offer them step 2 or step 3 or counselling treatments. Please click here to refer yourself to our services.


Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

After a traumatic experience you may not have fully recovered. This may lead to PTSD symptoms. You can experience gaps in your memory of the event(s), nightmares, flashbacks and distressing visions and thoughts. As a consequence you may feel agitated and vigilant. You may also feel numb. Avoiding certain situations or places may become part of your routine and it can have a big impact on your daily life.

What can I do about it?

If you recognise any of these signs we may be able to help. If someone is feeling this way we would usually offer them step 3 cognitive behavioural therapy. This is because the evidence shows that step 3 treatment is the most effective for treating PTSD. Please click here to find out how to refer yourself to our services.


Adjustment Disorder

We all experience stressful events in our lives. Adjustment Disorder is when one finds it difficult to cope with the stressful events or changes in their lives. Examples of stressful events can include divorce, bereavement, serious illness, financial difficulties or moving home. People with an adjustment disorder may become preoccupied and/or distressed with the stressful event, feel low or depressed, anxious and worried; and feel overwhelmed and unable to cope. They may also experience physical symptoms such as insomnia, headaches and abdominal or chest pain. Adjustment Disorder can also have an impact on your ability to carry out daily activities.

What can I do about it?

If you recognise any of these signs we may be able to help. If someone is feeling this way we would usually offer them step 3 treatments. This is because the evidence shows that step 3 treatment is the most effective for treating Adjustment Disorders. Please click here to find out how to refer yourself to our services.

Anxiety

Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) is when worry starts interfering with daily life. You may find that you are worrying a lot about the future and going through ‘what if’ scenarios in your head. This could mean you avoid certain situations because you are worried they might go badly.

Other signs and symptoms can include:

  • Feeling nervous, anxious or on edge
  • Feeling restless
  • Finding it hard to relax and switch off
  • A sense of dread – a fear that something bad could happen

What can I do about it?

If you recognise any of these signs, then we may be able to help. If someone is feeling this way we would usually offer them a type of cognitive behavioural therapy – either a step 2 or step 3 treatment. This is because the evidence shows that step 2 or step 3 treatments are the most effective for treating anxiety. Please click here to find out how to refer yourself to our services.


Social Anxiety

Social anxiety can mean you feel afraid in social situations and worry a lot about what other people think of you. Because of this, you may spend time thinking about how you are presenting yourself and worry that you could be doing something embarrassing in public. You might worry that you are blushing or are hot and sweaty. After social situations, you may re-play what happened in your head and feel anxious. Because of this you can start to avoid seeing others, especially new people.

What can I do about it?

If you recognise any of these signs we may be able to help. If someone is feeling this way we would usually offer them step 3 cognitive behavioural therapy. This is because the evidence shows that step 3 treatment is the most effective for treating social anxiety. Please click here to find out how to refer yourself to our services.


Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

OCD is an anxiety disorder which can also make you feel down and stressed. We can all have unwanted thoughts which pop into our mind, like a worry we haven’t locked the door or a fear we could contract a disease from touching something. However, in OCD these intrusive thoughts can become obsessive – we can’t stop thinking about them and they interrupt our daily life.

Common obsessive thoughts can include:

  • A need for order and symmetry – you need everything to be ‘just right’.
  • A fear you could deliberately harm yourself or someone else – even though you don’t want to. This could also be a fear that you will sexually assault another adult or a child.
  • A fear you could harm yourself or others by accident, for example if you left the cooker on and it started a fire.
  • A fear of contamination to yourself or a loved one by a disease, an infection or another substance.

Compulsions are actions you carry to try and deal with the obsessive thoughts. For example, hand washing, checking something repeatedly such as the oven, cleaning excessively, or avoiding certain situations like using public toilets or visiting the GP. Some of these behaviours may be carried out internally as well, like counting to a certain number in your head. You can spend a lot of time doing these actions and they can restrict you and what you’re able to do.

What can I do about it?

If you recognise any of these signs we may be able to help. If someone is feeling this way we would usually offer them a type of cognitive behavioural therapy – either a step 2 or step 3 treatment. This is because the evidence shows that step 2 or step 3 treatments are the most effective for treating OCD. Please click here to find out how to refer yourself to our services.


Panic Attacks

Panic attacks are a rush of psychological and physical symptoms. They are scary and often unexpected. When you have a panic attack you can feel dizzy, sweaty, sick, find it hard to breathe or feel like you’re choking. You may also experience an increased heart rate, and chest pain. These physical sensations make you feel as though something awful is happening, like you’re having a heart attack, or you might also be afraid that you could die. The actual situation is not a threat but your body may deal with it as though it is harmful. As a consequence of panic attacks you might start avoiding certain situations where you have had a panic attack, like busy places, or you may develop ‘safety behaviours’. These behaviours are things you do to help you feel safe, such as always having a bottle of water with you, but actually keep the problem going.

What can I do about it?

If you recognise any of these signs we may be able to help. If someone is feeling this way we would usually offer them a type of cognitive behavioural therapy – either a step 2 or step 3 treatment. This is because the evidence shows that step 2 or step 3 treatments are the most effective for treating panic attacks. Please click here to find out how to refer yourself to our services.


 Health Anxiety

Health Anxiety is a reoccurring fear that you have a serious illness even though you are healthy. When you notice differences in your body, this may be used to support your thoughts. Common anxieties involve a fear that you have HIV/AIDS, cancer and Parkinson’s disease. A significant amount of time may be spent researching illnesses and checking your symptoms. This anxiety can interfere with daily life, for example, relationships can become tense.

What can I do about it?

If you recognise any of these signs we may be able to help. If someone is feeling this way we would usually offer them step 3 cognitive behavioural therapy. This is because the evidence shows that step 3 treatment is the most effective for treating health anxiety. Please click here to find out how to refer yourself to our services.

Phobias

Phobias are extreme and unrealistic fears felt towards an object, situation or a feeling. When you are presented with the object or activity you have a phobia of, it can result in physical symptoms, such as increased breathing, increased heart rate and sweaty palms. There are a wide variety of phobias such as of different animals, driving, or confined spaces and many people suffer from them. Phobias can cause you to avoid situations and restrict your life, such as never going to the park because you are afraid of dogs.

What can I do about it?

If you recognise any of these signs we may be able to help. If someone is feeling this way we would usually offer them a type of cognitive behavioural therapy – either a step 2 or step 3 treatment. This is because the evidence shows that step 2 or step 3 treatments are the most effective for treating agoraphobia. Please click here to find out how to refer yourself to our services.


Agoraphobia

Agoraphobia is a fear of being trapped in a situation where escape would be hard or it would be difficult to get help. This is often accompanied with panic problems (see panic attacks – LINK). It involves experiencing intense fear in certain situations; such as leaving home, walking down a busy street or using public transport. Often you may avoid many situations to avoid these fearful feelings. This restricts your life and can make you very dependent on others.

What can I do about it?

If you recognise any of these signs we may be able to help. If someone is feeling this way we would usually offer them a type of cognitive behavioural therapy – either a step 2 or step 3 treatment. This is because the evidence shows that step 2 or step 3 treatments are the most effective for treating agoraphobia. Please click here to find out how to refer yourself to our services.

Insomnia

Insomnia refers to a difficulty in falling asleep or staying asleep for the required amount of time to feel refreshed the next morning, despite having enough opportunity to sleep during the night. Someone with insomnia will often wake up during the night, feel tired or irritable the next day, and/or find it difficult to function during the day. Insomnia can be caused by a number of reasons which include depression, stress, ageing, or medical reasons.

What can I do about it?

If you recognise any of these signs we may be able to help. If someone is feeling this way we would offer them step 2 or step 3 treatments. Please click here to refer yourself to our services.

Long-Term Health Conditions

Having a long-term health condition can not only be physically demanding, but also mentally and emotionally. Depression, anger and/or anxiety are common responses. You may think that no one understands you and that the less physically obvious the condition is, the less others will empathise with you. Medication and other areas of your life may start to be neglected. Some parts of life could be more difficult, such as your relationships with others because you might find it hard to explain how your condition affects you. Support can help to understand and accept the way you are feeling, as well as develop new ways of coping.

What can I do about it?

If you recognise any of these signs we may be able to help. If someone is feeling this way we would offer them step 2 or step 3 or counselling treatments. Please click here to find out how to refer yourself to our services.


Health Anxiety

Health anxiety is a reoccurring fear that you have a serious illness even though you are healthy. When you notice differences in your body, this may be used to support your thoughts. Common anxieties involve a fear that you have HIV/AIDS, cancer and Parkinson’s disease. A significant amount of time may be spent researching illnesses and checking your symptoms. This anxiety can interfere with daily life, for example, relationships can become tense.

What can I do about it?

If you recognise any of these signs we may be able to help. If someone is feeling this way we would usually offer them step 3 cognitive behavioural therapy. This is because the evidence shows that step 3 treatment is the most effective for treating health anxiety. Please click here to find out how to refer yourself to our services.